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Aidan McAteer

Lecturer in Veterinary Physiotherapy
Faculty:
Faculty of Science and Engineering
School:
Writtle School of Agriculture, Animal and Environmental Sciences
Location:
Writtle
Research Supervision:
Yes

Aidan graduated from Writtle University College with a Masters in Veterinary Physiotherapy in 2020. He began working in a small animal hospital as a student nurse and in-house physio, then as a lecturer in Writtle from September 2021.

[email protected]

Background

Having graduated in the midst of a pandemic, Aidan gained experience by starting his career in a north London veterinary hospital. Here, he learnt a lot about real-life cases, but chose to follow another career trajectory by becoming a lecturer.

In September 2021, Aidan started out as a demonstrator of veterinary physiotherapy, and worked as an assistant to university lecturers in Writtle. He was promoted to a full-time lecturing role in July 2022. Following that, in March 2023 Aidan realised another career goal by becoming a published author: his first research article was published in the International Journal of Equine Science. Following on from this, Aidan hopes to conduct more research and move on to his next goal of completing a PhD in Equine Biomechanics and Musculoskeletal System.

Spoken Languages
  • French
  • English
Research interests
  • External influences on the equine musculoskeletal system
  • Equine rehab protocols
  • Equine biomechanics
Areas of research supervision
  • Equine physiotherapy
  • Equine biomechanics
  • Equine rehab protocols
  • Canine physiotherapy
  • Canine biomechanics
  • Canine rehab protocols
Teaching
Qualifications
  • Masters in Veterinary Physiotherapy
Selected recent publications

McAteer, A., Gill, R. and Ferro de Godoy, R., 2023. Impact of forage presentation on the equine brachiocephalicus mechanical nociceptive threshold (MNT) and forelimb kinematics. International Journal of Equine Science.